CANADIAN Politics And Investing ( F. TOITS) - Healthcare is broke! - CANADIAN Politics And Investing ( F. TOITS) - InvestorVillage


CANADIAN Politics And Investing ( F. TOITS)
This is a semi-private group. You are free to browse messages, but you must be a member of this group to post messages. Join This Group

Group: CANADIAN Politics And Investing ( F. TOITS)   /  Message Board  /  Read Message

 
 






Keyword
Subject
Between
and
Rec'd By
Authored By
Minimum Recs
  
Previous Message  Next Message    Post Message    Post a Reply return to message boardtop of board
Msg  66256 of 66365  at  1/29/2023 4:18:51 PM  by

apprentice


Healthcare is broke!

Can Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canadaís 13 premiers and territorial leaders fix our health care system that decades of federal and provincial governments of all political stripes broke?
Obviously it canít all be done at once when they gather in Ottawa Feb. 7 to set the stage for a deal where the federal government will increase funding to the provinces and territories in return for conditions on that funding they will have to agree to individually.

The problems go back decades. Fixing them will take years.

The question is whether the agreements arrived at today will point Canadian health care in the right direction, with effective reforms.

Politicians going back decades were responsible for creating the myths that Canadaís health system care is free, publicly-funded and the best in the world.

In reality, our system is expensive compared to other countries around the world with comparable universal health care systems.

Thirty per cent of our health care is privately funded.

GOLDSTEIN: Health care is broken and our governments broke it
Author of the article: Lorrie Goldstein
Rural emergency department shut downs, record waits for care, frustrated patients, exhausted and demoralized staff: It is a summer of chaos in Ontario hospitals.
Rural
Can Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canadaís 13 premiers and territorial leaders fix our health care system that decades of federal and provincial governments of all political stripes broke?

Obviously it canít all be done at once when they gather in Ottawa Feb. 7 to set the stage for a deal where the federal government will increase funding to the provinces and territories in return for conditions on that funding they will have to agree to individually.

The problems go back decades. Fixing them will take years.

The question is whether the agreements arrived at today will point Canadian health care in the right direction, with effective reforms.

Politicians going back decades were responsible for creating the myths that Canadaís health system care is free, publicly-funded and the best in the world.

In reality, our system is expensive compared to other countries around the world with comparable universal health care system.


HEALTH CARE, DEPRESSURIZED: Premier Ford announces publicly funded, privately delivered surgeries
Sun Editor-in- Chief Adrienne Batra talks to political columnist Brian Lilley about the announcement from the Doug Ford government on how they will take the pressure off Ontario's health-care system.
0 seconds of 10 minutes, 27 seconds
While there are many positive examples of excellent health care ó in spite of rather than because of the current system ó internationally, Canadaís medical outcomes overall are mediocre compared to similar countries.

Canadians face some of the longest medical wait times for treatment in the developed world in a system with too few frontline health care providers and insufficient operating rooms and equipment, such as MRIs.

The reason Canada has too few doctors is due to deliberate policies by provincial governments starting in the 1990s, when Ottawa reduced transfer payments to the provinces in order to balance the federal budget that was out of control at the time.

The theory ó promoted by so-called health care economists within Canadaís overly bureaucratized health care system ó was that graduating fewer doctors by reducing the public funding of medical schools, would mean lower costs because there would be fewer doctors treating patients and ordering tests.

What happened instead is that the number of Canadians without family doctors skyrocketed.

That resulted in higher costs, because without family doctors, patients end up in hospital emergency rooms for both minor and more serious health care issues ó where it is far more expensive to treat them.


The pandemic fully exposed long-term deficiencies in Canadaís health-care system, including high costs with unacceptably long wait limes for treatment and mediocre outcomes.
GOLDSTEIN; Canada isnít broken, government is
Canadians pay more for health care through their taxes than 29 comparable countries with universal health care, while enduring the longest wait times for treatment among the 10 that track this data, according to a new study by the Fraser Institute.
GOLDSTEIN: Canadian health care ó high costs, long waits
A woman wearing a mask and gloves carries a shopping bag during a phased reopening from the coronavirus restrictions in Toronto May 19, 2020.
GOLDSTEIN: Freedom in Canada and globally on decline,
While we donít have enough family doctors or nurses ó many burned out by the COVID-19 pandemic ó we do have an overabundance of highly-paid, empire-building government health care bureaucrats, constantly creating new forms for doctors to fill out, cutting into the time they care for patients.

Data sharing of health care information often borders on the absurd.

At the height of the pandemic, governments were in many cases, compiling and sharing information by fax machine, apparently having missed the computer age.

Transferring patientís medical histories from paper to electronic records has been laboriously slow and expensive, with governments presiding over the process repeatedly wasting time and money because of incompetence.


Overcrowded emergency rooms and hallway medicine were created by years of provincial governments failing to create sufficient chronic and long-term care beds, meaning people ended up in acute care hospitals because there was nowhere else for them to go.

It doesnít help when fear-mongering defenders of the broken status quo in health care portray any attempts at reform as creating two-tier, American-style health care, which no one who understands the issues is talking about.

Letís all hope for some meaningful breakthroughs on these issues in the latest round of federal-provincial-territorial negotiations.

But donít hold your breath.


     e-mail to a friend      printer-friendly     add to library      
|  
Recs: 1  
   Views: 0 []
Previous Message  Next Message    Post Message    Post a Reply return to message boardtop of board




Financial Market Data provided by
.
Loading...